Is extreme ketosis good for you? It wasn't good for me . . . Plus, results of ketogenic diet blood tests after 4 weeks on Dr. Seyfried's keto for cancer diet.

Week 4 of my attempt to follow Dr. Seyfried's ketogenic diet, including keto-adaptation challenges, effects on my hormonal cycle, and a dairy experiment.

How does being sick on a ketogenic diet affect the body? My attempt to stick to Dr. Seyfried's cancer diet recommendations while enduring the common cold.

The important relationship between protein and ketosis: How I finally got my ketones above 4.0 mM, as Dr. Seyfried recommends for people with cancer.

Why I broke my fast: A detailed account of my transition from fasting to a ketogenic diet, inspired by Prof Seyfried's book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

What happens to ketones, blood sugar, and appetite during a 3-day fast? A detailed account of my fasting experiment inspired by Dr. Seyfried's book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

Which diets work best for treating and preventing cancer? Low carbohydrate/ketogenic diets based on Thomas Seyfried's book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

How does the ketogenic diet work to slow cancer growth? Read a summary of Dr. Thomas Seyfried's recommendations about how to treat cancer using ketogenic diets. 

How damage to mitochondria causes cancer. Part 2 of a 4-part series about Thomas Seyfried's vitally important book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

Cancer may not be caused by genetic mutations after all. Thomas Seyfried's new book makes a powerful argument for cancer as a metabolic (dietary) disease.

Did you know potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers and goji berries can be toxic to your digestive and nervous systems? Discover the fascinating science of nightshades.

All you need to know about Nectresse and monkfruit extract—ingredients, safety information, taste, and effects on blood sugar and insulin levels.

Could you improve (or even cure) your ADHD by eliminating specific foods from your diet? European studies that placed children with ADHD on restricted diets showed significant results.

While many parents suspect sugar plays a role in their children’s behavior, studies conducted in the 1980s and 1990s debunked this theory. But maybe we shouldn't abandon this line of thought so quickly.

The two key brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) in ADHD are dopamine and norepinephrine. Protein and fat play a critical role in their regulation. Can we rebalance our brain chemistry with our diet?