Download the FREE E-book:

Download your free guide to refined carbohydrates and get notified of Dr. Ede's latest posts.

Free Download

Permissions Policy (last updated June 28, 2020)

All textual content on this site is owned and copyrighted by Georgia Ede MD of Diagnosis:Diet. Images are either owned by us or have been licensed to us for use on this site. In order to balance the desire to widely distribute the information on the site while protecting our intellectual property rights, the following permissions policy indicates what can be shared with and without our permission. Please note that this policy pertains to all text and images on the site and applies to all of Dr. Ede's posts published on Psychology Today as well.

To contact us for permission, please use the contact form on the Site, found under the “Contact” tab in the navigation menu.

Without Permission

You are free to do the following without our permission:

  • Link to the site or any specific post on the site.
  • Extract and re-post no more than 200 words on any other site, provided you link back to our original post.
  • Print our posts and photocopy up to 50 copies for internal distribution within your own school, company, or organization, provided you include this copyright notice: “© 2020, Georgia Ede MD. All rights reserved. Originally published at www.diagnosisdiet.com.”

Although not required, if you do share our content, we would love to hear about it from you, as it helps us understand what content is valued by our readers. We may, at our discretion, choose to promote your post. You can communicate with us through our contact form.

Permission Required

You must have our express written consent to do any of the following:

  • Use this content for any commercial purposes.
  • Translate and/or publish our posts in other languages.
  • Reprint the content in any print or electronic newsletter or publication.
  • Reproduce and distribute the content in any way except as described in the preceding section.

Not allowed

  • Re-posting posts in their entirety. (Refer to the above section pertaining to maximum number of words allowed).
  • Altering or transforming the content.
  • Extracting and reposting photographs or illustrations.

Meet Anne: a dedicated woman who successfully lost weight using ketosis—a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carb diet—and documented her progress along the way.

Is extreme ketosis good for you? It wasn't good for me . . . Plus, results of ketogenic diet blood tests after 4 weeks on Dr. Seyfried's keto for cancer diet.

Week 4 of my attempt to follow Dr. Seyfried's ketogenic diet, including keto-adaptation challenges, effects on my hormonal cycle, and a dairy experiment.

How does being sick on a ketogenic diet affect the body? My attempt to stick to Dr. Seyfried's cancer diet recommendations while enduring the common cold.

The important relationship between protein and ketosis: How I finally got my ketones above 4.0 mM, as Dr. Seyfried recommends for people with cancer.

Why I broke my fast: A detailed account of my transition from fasting to a ketogenic diet, inspired by Prof Seyfried's book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

What happens to ketones, blood sugar, and appetite during a 3-day fast? A detailed account of my fasting experiment inspired by Dr. Seyfried's book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

Which diets work best for treating and preventing cancer? Low carbohydrate/ketogenic diets based on Thomas Seyfried's book Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

How does the ketogenic diet work to slow cancer growth? Read a summary of Dr. Thomas Seyfried's recommendations about how to treat cancer using ketogenic diets. 

How damage to mitochondria causes cancer. Part 2 of a 4-part series about Thomas Seyfried's vitally important book, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease.

Cancer may not be caused by genetic mutations after all. Thomas Seyfried's new book makes a powerful argument for cancer as a metabolic (dietary) disease.

Did you know potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, peppers and goji berries can be toxic to your digestive and nervous systems? Discover the fascinating science of nightshades.

All you need to know about Nectresse and monkfruit extract—ingredients, safety information, taste, and effects on blood sugar and insulin levels.

Could you improve (or even cure) your ADHD by eliminating specific foods from your diet? European studies that placed children with ADHD on restricted diets showed significant results.

While many parents suspect sugar plays a role in their children’s behavior, studies conducted in the 1980s and 1990s debunked this theory. But maybe we shouldn't abandon this line of thought so quickly.

The two key brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) in ADHD are dopamine and norepinephrine. Protein and fat play a critical role in their regulation. Can we rebalance our brain chemistry with our diet?

Get answers to common questions about cranberries and health. Does cranberry juice prevent urinary tract infections? Why are cranberries sour?

As fall approaches, let's take a look at our favorite pumpkins and squashes. Are they really the vitamin-A-rich, cancer-fighting powerhouses we are told they are?

Can people with gout eat meat? What is the best diet for gout? In this post we take a closer look at purines, alcohol, and sugar in the management of gout.

Public health officials and nutrition experts love to sing the praises of the virtuous cruciferous vegetable family. But could crucifers have a dark side?

Could your diet prevent mania, mood swings, depression, or anxiety? Sound far-fetched? Maybe not. Dietary changes can have very powerful effects on brain chemistry—especially low carb diets.

People are often told that bipolar disorders are the result of a “chemical imbalance” that must be corrected with medications . . . but what causes this chemical imbalance? 

Dancing in the dark? Your diet may be causing your restless legs syndrome. Here are seven specific recommendations for how to treat RLS without medications.

Constipation can cause significant inconvenience, discomfort, and even disability for some individuals, but can usually be alleviated by knowing which foods are gumming up the works.

What makes a carbohydrate refined and at what point of refinement does it become unhealthy? Refined carbohydrates are forms of sugars and starches that are not found as is in nature.