Carbohydrate Sensitivity Quiz

ARE YOU CARBOHYDRATE-SENSITIVE?

Take my carbohydrate sensitivity quiz to find out!

High
Low
Score: 0
  1. Do you feel sleepy or foggy 2 hours or less after eating a meal or snack that contains sugars or starches?
    Yes
  2. Do you tend to gain weight around your middle, instead of in your hips and thighs?
    Yes
  3. Does your weight fluctuate a lot?
    Yes
  4. Do you feel hungry when you shouldn’t need any more food?
    Yes
  5. Do you frequently crave sweets, starches, or dairy products?
    Yes
  6. Do you wake up in the middle of the night and have a hard time getting back to sleep unless you eat something sweet or starchy?
    Yes
  7. Do you get irritable, restless, tense, or anxious in the early evening before dinner?
    Yes
  8. Do you have a hard time controlling how much sugar or starch you eat?
    Yes
  9. Do you have symptoms of “hypoglycemia” if you don’t eat every 2-3 hours? [Typical hypoglycemic symptoms include feeling shaky, panicky, irritable, anxious, or lightheaded when you’re hungry.]
    Yes
  10. Are you an “emotional eater?”
    Yes
  11. Do you gain weight easily?
    Yes
  12. Do any of the following diseases run in your immediate family?
    • Obesity?
      Yes
    • High cholesterol?
      Yes
    • Type 2 Diabetes?
      Yes
  13. Do you often binge on sweets, starches, or dairy products?
    Yes
  14. Are you obsessed with food?
    Yes
  15. Do you prefer sweets and starches over all other types of food?
    Yes
  16. Do sweets and starches make you feel temporarily less depressed or less anxious?
    Yes
  17. Do you feel you need to carry food with you wherever you go?
    Yes
  18. Are you very hungry first thing in the morning?
    Yes
  19. Do you tend to get panicky or hungry while exercising?
    Yes
  20. Women only: Do you feel much more emotional in the days prior to your period?
    Yes

Your carbohydrate sensitivity score is 0.

What does my score mean?

The more YES answers you have, the more likely it is that you are sensitive to carbohydrates (insulin resistant), and the more seriously you should consider cutting back on carbohydrates in your diet.

1 to 5: YELLOW ZONE. Possible mild carbohydrate sensitivity.
6 to 12: ORANGE ZONE. Likely moderate carbohydrate sensitivity.
13 or higher: RED ZONE. Very likely strong carbohydrate sensitivity.

How can I be sure my symptoms are due to carbohydrates?

These symptoms are just a collection of common clues. For more accurate information about your carbohydrate metabolism, you should ask your doctor for an evaluation and request blood tests. These tests can help determine whether or not you are already on the road to diabetes and related health problems. In the final section of this post there’s a link to a list of the latest lab tests and other practical resources to help you prepare for a conversation with your doctor.

There are also other medical conditions which can cause some of the symptoms mentioned in the quiz. This is another important reason to see your health care professional for an evaluation to make sure that your symptoms aren’t due to another health problem, such as a thyroid condition.

If my score is low, is it ok for me to eat sweets and starches?

If your score is 0 or in the lower end of the yellow zone, your body probably handles carbohydrates better than most, which means you may be at lower risk for carbohydrate-related diseases. However, we can’t say your risk is zero, because there isn’t enough scientific research available to answer this question.

Also, your score can easily change over time. Our ability to process carbohydrates tends to gradually worsen as we get older. Some people do fine with carbohydrates until they reach a certain age or stage of life—puberty, pregnancy, middle-age, or menopause. This is partly due to natural hormonal changes, but also may be influenced by the amount and type of carbohydrate we eat. So, even if your score is low now, it could rise over time. Choosing healthier forms of carbohydrate from now on may help to keep your score low as you get older, and keep your risk of carbohydrate-related diseases low.
SodaStream (Soda-Club) USA

If my score is high, do I have to stop eating all carbohydrates in order to feel better?

Not necessarily. Some people with high scores do just fine if they simply avoid sugars, refined carbohydrates, and other foods that rapidly raise blood sugar and insulin levels.[For a complete list of “bad” carbohydrates, please see my refined carbohydrates list.]. Others have to remove almost all forms of carbohydrate to restore their health. Everyone’s metabolism is different.

If your score is in the upper orange zone or in the red zone, you may be at higher risk for carbohydrate-related health problems, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, heart disease, and fatty liver disease. I don’t want you to be discouraged, though–in fact, I want you to think of a high score as a helpful early warning sign of problems to come. You can improve your metabolism very quickly and greatly reduce your risk simply by reducing your carbohydrate intake! Even if you already have a carbohydrate-related health problem, reducing your carbohydrate intake is the most powerful way to turn things around!

What Should I Do Next?

Regardless of your quiz score, the single most important thing you can do for your health is to reduce the amount of sugar and refined carbohydrates in your diet! It is amazing how quickly the body responds to being fed properly. You can begin improving your metabolism and protecting your health around in just a few weeks!

  1. KNOW YOUR RISK. Learn where you are on the carbohydrate sensitivity/insulin resistance/pre-diabetes spectrum by obtaining a medical evaluation including blood tests. For a free downloadable PDF of lab tests with their target values, a simple formula for estimating your insulin resistance, recommendations for how much carbohydrate you should consume based on your metabolism, and an infographic with tips for making healthier choices and improving your metabolism, see my post How to Diagnose, Prevent and Treat Insulin Resistance.
  2. EDUCATE YOURSELF ABOUT SUGAR AND HEALTH. To learn more about the link between insulin resistance (poor carbohydrate metabolism) and serious chronic illness, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, fatty liver disease, heart disease, obesity, and gout, read my post Why Sugar is Bad For You.
  3. EXPLORE LOWER-CARBOHYDRATE DIETS. To learn more about low-carbohydrate diets, some of the challenges you might encounter, and get some helpful resources, visit the Low-Carbohydrate Diets page. If you are ready to experiment with the level of carbohydrate in your diet, visit the Carbohydrate Sensitivity Diet Options page.

Recommended Cookbooks that Eliminate Refined Carbs

21-Day Detox book cover 21 Day Sugar Detox is written by holistic nutritionist Diane Sanfilippo. Every recipe in this fantastic cookbook is free of refined carbohydrates. Most are quite low in natural sugars and starches as well, making them suitable for low-carb diets. Diane provides accurate information, wise guidance, and delicious menu plans that allow for flexibility with respect to grains, legumes, dairy, and carbohydrate quantity.

The Whole 30 book cover Powerhouse husband and wife team Melissa and Dallas Hartwig have inspired countless people to eat real food. The Whole 30 is THE classic Paleo beginner’s guide and cookbook, and is chock full of moral support, education, and humor. Every recipe is free of refined carbohydrates, processed foods, grains, legumes, and dairy products. Their plan is designed to last for 30 days but I’d recommend adding a few zeroes to that number.

Nom Nom Paleo book coverThis brilliantly creative whole foods cookbook is the brainchild of husband and wife team Michelle Tam and Henry Fong, and is designed to be fun for the whole family. All recipes are free of refined carbohydrates, grains, legumes and processed foods, and most are dairy-free. Nom Nom Paleo is a favorite in my household and we use their recipes all the time. You simply MUST try the Slow Cooker Kalua Pig. Yum.

Here’s to your good health!

Please note that after 30 days, Dr. Ede may not personally respond to comments, however comments shall remain open to encourage community discussion.

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Last Modified: Aug 3, 2016 at 2:28pm