7 Tips for Restless Legs Syndrome

octopus with restless legs syndromeDancing in the dark?  Muscle movements are regulated by dopamine (a neurotransmitter) in the brain and spinal cord.  Dopamine tells leg muscles to relax at night, so without enough dopamine, muscles can remain hyperactive.  In order to make dopamine, you need amino acids (either phenylalanine or tyrosine) from protein, and you need iron.

 

  1. Make sure you are eating enough protein.  [See my protein page for minimum daily requirements and best sources.]
  2. You might have low iron stores.  Ask your doctor to check your “ferritin” level, which tells you how much iron you have stored in your body.  People with the most bothersome symptoms tend to have ferritin levels of less than 50 ng/ml. If your ferritin is low, it may help to increase your intake of iron-rich foods.  Animal foods such as red meat and liver are especially good sources of “heme” iron, which is 8 times more available to our bodies than plant-based “non-heme” iron.  Iron deficiency is especially common in infants, pregnant women, vegetarians, and vegans.
  3. Vitamin C improves the absorption of the iron found in plant foods and in traditional iron supplements, so if you do not eat animal foods, you may want to consider taking a vitamin C supplement.  Vitamins C and E both seem to help iron work better in the body.  [Doses that were helpful in studies were 200 mg of Vitamin C and 400 mg of Vitamin E per day.]
  4. Caffeine, alcohol, and nicotine can cause RLS or make RLS symptoms worse in some people, so avoid these and see if your symptoms improve.
  5. Food sensitivities have been shown to cause RLS in certain individuals.  While any food could be a potential culprit, the ones documented in scientific studies are:  milk, coffee, eggs, aspartame (Nutrasweet®), tea, chocolate, citrus, raspberries, strawberries, potato, beef and pork.  Keeping a food and symptom journal by your bed can help you to notice possible connections between foods and RLS symptoms.
  6. Celiac disease, Crohn’s disease, and IBS-D are all associated with higher risk for RLS.  Celiac disease is a serious autoimmune disease triggered by gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and triticale.  25 to 30 percent of people with Celiac disease have RLS.  If you have RLS, it is very important to get a blood test for Celiac disease, because left untreated, it has the potential to do widespread damage to the body.  A gluten-free diet can significantly reduce RLS symptoms in many patients with Celiac disease within 6-9 months. Even if you do not have Celiac disease, a gluten-free diet may be worth trying, as gluten is a common cause of food sensitivities.
  7. Medications can cause RLS, especially antidepressant medicines that increase serotonin activity (SSRI’s like Prozac® and Celexa®), and medicines that reduce dopamine activity (atypical mood stabilizers, such as Zyprexa® and Risperdal®). If you suspect a medicine may be causing RLS, please do not stop the medicine abruptly; discuss your concerns with your clinician.
How about you?  Have you noticed any connections between food and your restless legs symptoms?
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REFERENCES

Basu PP et al.  Prevalence of restless leg syndrome in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.  World J Gastroenterol 2011;17(39):4404-7.

Gerrard JW et al.  Neuropharmacological evaluation of movement disorders that are adverse reactions to specific foods.  Intern J Neuroscience 1994; 76:61-69.

Gerrard JW and Richardson JS.  Periodic limb movement disorders and spells of profound muscle weakness due to airborne and dietary factors in humans.  Intern J Neuroscience 2004; 114:1483-1492.

Moccia M et al.  Restless legs syndrome is a common feature of adult celiac disease. Mov Disord 2012; 25(7):8877-881.

Peirano P et al.  Iron deficiency anemia in infancy exerts long-term effects on the tibialis anterior motor activity during sleep in childhood.  Sleep Medicine 2012; 13: 1006-1012.

Sagheb MM et al.  Efficacy of vitamins C, E, and their combination for treatment of restless legs syndrome in hemodialysis patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.  Sleep Medicine 2012; 13: 542-545.

Trotti LM et al.  Iron for restless legs syndrome.  Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2012; 16(5): CD007834.

Wang J et al.  Efficacy of oral iron in patients with restless legs syndrome and a low-normal ferritin: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study.  Sleep Medicine 2009;10: 973–975.

Weinstock LB et al.  Celiac disease is associated with restless legs syndrome. Dig Dis Sci 2010; 55:1667–1673.

 

 

 

 

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  • yvonne

    only with whey protein; not an isolate; do I get severe and I mean severe body and joint pain and restless leg. what is the connection. if someone has the answer, please send to avenues.ofhealth@yahoo.com. thanks

  • Krysta Harvey

    thank you for posting! my husband and i have recently started paleo eating and i have been sharing with my family how much our health has improved. i was looking for ideas for my grandma who has a lot of trouble with restless leg symptoms. it is so hard to find anyone who looks for root causes and tries to address those rather than just prescribing medications! i think some of these factors may be causing her symptoms so i’m sending this to her. thanks again!

  • lilette

    I’d had restless legs syndrom for 3 months when I started the ketogenic diet at the beginning of April (for other purposes, so I was not expecting anything on this issue). The RLS stopped within a week, and has not returned since (it’s been 3 months). Asthma + seasonal allergies stopped completely as well (I’m not taking any medication for these now, for the first time in the last 35 years).

  • Jim Felder

    My wife has RLS which became progressively worse over the years and eventually begain taking ropinirole (Requip), which did control symptoms but with debilitating side effects. We both went on a plant based diet mainly so I wouldn’t have to go on statins and blood pressure meds. My cholesterol dropped from 215 to 140 and BP from 145/80 to 105/60, so mission accomplished. The amazing thing is that my wife’s RLS systems went away. She was able to completely discontinue the ropinirole. She has now been nearly symptom free for over 2 years. With experimentation, she has found that if she eats a meal with any added oil she will experience some mild symptoms. A very low fat plant based diet has basically given my wife her life back. Now she is the one that is absolutely adamant about sticking to our diet.

    As for your list of 7 tips, we don’t have to worry about protein. A plant based diet has more than enough that there is no need to focus on that. Same for iron and Vitamin C. We eat huge amount of leafy green vegetables and fruit, so we get all we need from our food. In fact she was borderline anemic when she at animal foods, but now has hemocrit levels at the high end of normal. As for food sensitivities, she is extremely sensitive to caffeine and it will drive her RLS nuts, so she absolutely avoid that. Even the small amount in chocolate can be a problem, so she limits to a small piece when she does indulge. 6 isn’t an issue, but you are right on the money with 7. During a bad patch she tried Paxil. She managed to keep taking it for a week, but her RLS was so bad that she basically didn’t sleep for more than an hour at a time for most of that week and several days after as the drug worked its way out of her system.

  • Jim Felder

    Oh, and I think the associations with iron, vitamin C, IBS and maybe even Celiac may be co-morbities with a low nutrient, athrosclerotic diet also known as the standard American diet. I have read that RLS may be tied to low oxygen in a particular motion related center of the brain. Low iron can reduce the overall oxygen carry capacity of the blood, but for it to be an issue only in one particular area there has to also be a poor profusion rate for that area. Athrosclerotic plaques can definitely effect profusion as can be seen in cardiac issue like angina. The progression of RLS prevalence and severity with age fits with proliferation of the number and size of plaques as does the reversal of systems of my wife when she started an anti-athrosclerotic very low fat plant based diet. In fact the diet we eat is very close to the diet developed by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn that halted and reversed the arterial blockage for extremely ill heart disease patients that conformed to the diet. The diet worked for all 18 conforming patients in the first study with no further cardiovascular events in over 25 years. In a new study it was effective in reversing the heart disease of over 95% of the 200 conforming patients.